When in Scottsdale Three Places for Art Lovers

When in Scottsdale: Three Places for Art Lovers

Three Places in Scottsdale for Art LoversScottsdale is a city located in the eastern part of Maricopa County, Arizona. It is one of the largest cities in Arizona with a population of 236,839 as of July 2015. It’s known for the slogan “West’s Most Western Town” and dubbed by The New York Times as the “desert version of Miami’s South Beach” and as having “plenty of late night partying and buzzing hotel scene”.

Clearly, Scottsdale is a bustling city with a lot to offer to tourists and residents alike. You can take hot air balloon rides across the Sonoran desert, enjoy gastronomical southwest cuisine, hike at McDowell Sonoran Preserve, and enjoy shows. Meanwhile, the city also has a lot in store for art enthusiasts. Whether you’re looking for inspiration or simply want to broaden your horizons, here are four art spots to visit while you’re in Scottsdale.

  1. Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art (SMoCA)

Address: 7374 East Second Street Scottsdale, AZ 85251

Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art is on East Second Street and situated in a twenty-one acre landscaped park downtown. It is known for contemporary art, architecture, and design from around the world. The museum is packed with different programs on various facets of art such as music, literature, dance, performance, and film.

“When you enter the Museum you will discover a surprise in the outdoor courtyard: one of the most beautiful James Turrell Skyspaces in the world. Always free for viewing during Museum hours, this space transports visitors to a place of quiet contemplation, a place of introspection. In this space you will remember why you seek art, why you visited SMoCA, why you now treasure a small institution in the middle of an oasis known as Scottsdale,” according to Sara Cochran, Director and Chief Curator of SMoCA.

Regardless of when you’re planning to visit Scottsdale, there will always be something in store for you at SMoCA as their calendars are packed with tours and exhibits all year-round.

  1. Frank Lloyd Wright Taliesin West

Address: 12621 N Frank Lloyd Wright Blvd, Scottsdale, AZ 85259, United States

Frank Lloyd Wright Taliesin West is a historic landmark that showcases Wright’s architectural genius, which took approximately 20 years to construct.

Taliesin West is situated in 491-acre land in the Sonoran Desert Preserve. Aside from the architectural style, what makes this place extra special is the dramatic backdrop of the Camelback Mountain and Valley of the Sun, providing a breathtakingly picturesque view.

To explore this architectural wonder, you can join tours of Frank Lloyd Wright’s winter home and workplace, which details the history of Taliesin West and the person who created it. There are three tours you can join—the panorama, insights, and night lights tour.

  1. Western Spirit: Scottsdale’s Museum of the West

Address: 3830 N Marshall Way, Scottsdale, AZ 85251, United States

Western Spirit: Scottsdale Museum of the West is situated in a 43,000-square foot building that features art history, culture and unique stories about the 19 states comprising the American West. Their exhibits feature Western art, rare history artifacts, and cultural treasures.

The museum is always filled with activities and attractions such as interactive exhibits, outdoor sculpture courtyard, museum store, performances, programs, and events that aim to uplift and celebrate the American West. It is also conveniently located within walking distance of restaurants, shopping centers, and Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art.

Can Art be an Investment?
Quick answer: It’s possible, but there are things you need to consider before viewing art as such.

According to a report, 75% of wealth managers reveal that their clients are planning on including artworks and collectibles as part of their wealth reports. Meanwhile, artworks are still garnering millions worth of bids in auctions. In fact, Pablo Picasso’s “Les femmes d’Alger” was sold for $179.4 million in an auction last year, setting a new world record for a single artwork bought at an auction.

Meanwhile, artworks can provide a hedge against financial needs or challenges when sold or used for a loan.


Institutions like Biltmore Loan and Jewelry,  with offices in Chandler and Scottsdale, purchases or lends on high-value assets which include different types of art such as paintings and sculptures.


Biltmore Loan and Jewelry offers a convenient process when it comes to selling and using artwork for a loan. All you need to do is get in touch with us by filling up our free appraisal form or bring your items along with any related paperwork for appraisal, and receive cash if you agree with our offer. Our goal is to help our clients the best way we can, and in most cases, we offer the highest rates in the market.

While art can provide some sort of financial whim, you shouldn’t collect them on a whim. There are factors you need to account before even purchasing your first artwork.

READ: Collecting Art: What You Need to Know

First, you need to have a genuine interest in art, because it’s the very thing that will prompt you to buy an artwork and grow your collection in time. Remember that artwork is not an investment product per se, and you shouldn’t purchase them just because you hope that it will generate ROI in the future. Purchase a piece because it speaks to you, and not because of its monetary value.

It’s also essential to consider the things that collecting art entails. You need to have the dedication to learn and understand the story and background of pieces, be aware of their details, and how to properly store them.

Appreciating art can is an activity that can prompt us to think deeply, get in touch with our souls, see the world from a different perspective, and admire an artist’s talent. While art is typically up to subjective interpretation, it can be an activity that binds friends and families together. So if you’re in Scottsdale, do not miss these three art spots and include them in your itinerary.

Img c/o Pexels.